Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Curly Maple Trestle Table with Painted Base and a New Cod Rib Rocker



Last week I finally delivered this table to a very nice couple in Vermont.  Many think that I would do a lot of work for people in Vermont but usually my local work amounts to one order per year.

I was very happy to receive this note a few days after the delivery.

"A note to let you know how much we appreciate the beautiful craftsmanship and finished result of the tiger maple trestle table.  The words used by our guests were’ stunning’ and they reflect our own sentiments.  You surprised our expectations!"



A tiger maple key to match the top.

Below is a new Cod Rib Rocker with the added detail of the carved gutter around the base of the spindles.  A while back, the same client in California requested the gutter detail on some New Waltham Side chairs.  I usually only put the gutter on my painted chairs but I think it looks nice.
Don't be afraid to suggest detail additions or modifications.  Many times the results are great.






The garden is doing great after all of the rain that we had.
Enjoy the rest of July.
Tim

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Trestle Table w/ Round Ends All Finished

I finally finished this table, photographed it, and it is now in it's new home.  I received a call from the client when the table arrived and they were very happy with how it came out. I love those calls.  I am looking forward to seeing pictures of it in place.

On to the next projects.
I have made a lot of progress on a pencil post bed, but am waiting for some custom hardware that I need before I can finish it.
In the meantime, I have started the next Trestle Table that will have a rectangle top and a painted base, a Cod Rib Rocker, a 5 1/2' Waltham Bench, and a set of Waltham Chairs.

size- 40" wide, 74" long, 30" tallTrestle Table w/ Round Ends
cherry trestle table
cherry trestle table
herry trestle table

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Back in the Shop

Before I went in for hip surgery, three weeks ago, I started a trestle table with round ends.  The round ends posed a bit of a challenge as a hand cut radius is very hard to make to appear true.  So, I made a jig for the router and cut the curves that way.


The edge treatment for this table base and top is a round that is less than a bullnose.  A router is used to define a uniform depth and then the curve is shaped by hand with a plane.  Below, shows the edge of the table routed and then finished.



Since I have recovered I have been working on the trestle base for the table.  I am make the joints with full through tenons, top and bottom that are wedged and pegged.

This detail of the trestle foot, shows the edge treatment that all of the parts receive.


A few shots of the shop below on a nice sunny day.





Below are a couple of Cod Rib Rockers that I dropped off at the Edgewater Gallery in Middlebury, VT just before my surgery.



And finally, below are some shots that show a 5' Waltham Bench seat being shaped. Another project that I finished before my surgery.











video


Enjoy the sunny weather. I got out for my first bike ride with my new hip.  That was really fun even if it was just 1/4 mile or so.  Happy Spring!

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Cherry Trestle Bench



A client asked for a trestle bench to go with my Trestle Dining Table.   It was impossible to scale the trestle structure down exactly as it would be much too weak but I was able to incorporate many of the  details that the table has.   The edge treatment for the top and base is the same as that of table.    The bench needs to be very strong as it is under more stress than a table with perhaps more than 300lbs of leaning, shifting, scooting humans at each meal.    The backless design also works well as sitters can climb in and out from the back without  the need to scoot the whole bench out.  
My exposed bed bolt design makes for a very sturdy trestle to beam joint.  The joint also has a glued mortice and tenon. 


The trestles are constructed with wedged, through tenons top and bottom. Very strong.

Steel hold down clips keep the top attached to the base.  I had  these made by Rob Grant, a local machinist who has helped my out in the past with other metal work needs.  



Robert Grant or Orwell, Vermont made the hold down hardware for me.  He works fast and delivers them in a nice little wooden box.






Everything in place. 



Saturday, October 4, 2014

Evan's Table


the table looks more orange here than in reality but cherry is very light when it is new. It will darken with age.

This is the Boat Top Table that I just made for a friend of mine from college.  The time consuming part of this table is due to the curved aprons that follow the same curve at the sides of the top.   First the aprons must be laminated into a curve and then the tenons that join them to the legs must be cut.  I suppose if I made this table all the time, I would have set up a jig to do this joint on a machine but since the last time I made this table was in 1999,  I did the joints by hand.  Planning is critical because I needed a large flat area in which to lay out the joint and to cut the joint.  The table top was perfect for this.   It allowed both ends of the curved apron to lay on the same plane so that they could be marked square to each other.
a solid plank is sawn into thin flitches which are laid out here for glueing.


the flitches are clamped over a form that I made in 1999 and have not used again until now. I was lucky to still have it.

the glued apron coming off of the form.
the rough lumber for the table top
final glue up of the table top

Two glued up aprons


set up to cut the shoulders of the tenons for the joint to the legs
the saw runs along the clamped scrap piece to make a nice straight cut. The tenon shape can be seen  marked on the side of the curved apron.



after the saw cut is made, the tenon is sized with a rabbet plane.

the curved apron joined to the legs


the rough table top glue up is made even with a hand plane, planing across the joints until they are all even



after rough sawing the shape, the top is propped in place so that the edges can be made true with a hand plane.

the ends are also planed smooth with a hand plane


sometimes other small jobs need doing.  my guitar was dropped on the input plug and a hole was punched through the side.  I glued on a cherry patch to reinforce the area.

a string of large rubber bands make great clamps

reinforcing corner braces and a center cross piece are added for strength

the table top os held in place with wooden buttons that allow for seasonal movement

and there we are

And,  in case you were wondering, the guitar is all fixed and working nicely.